Humane Society International / Brazil


SÃO PAULO—Animal welfare is a theme that has already gained traction within Latin America agribusiness, with an increasing number of companies taking stronger and more consistent actions to ensure more humane treatment of animals used in food production. To increase the dialogue on this market change, an international symposium, Animal Welfare: A Sustainable Business Strategy, was held on November 18 and 19 at Hotel Belas Artes in São Paulo. The symposium featured speakers from five countries and more than 150 professionals from throughout Latin America’s animal agriculture supply chain.

Hosted by Humane Society International and World Animal Protection, the event facilitated discussion and the exchange of ideas and expertise among representatives of the food, production, retail, financial and government sectors around actions and commitments aimed at promoting the welfare of pigs and egg laying hens.

“HSI welcomed the opportunity to host and participate in this critical dialogue between companies and producers as they work to transition to cage- and crate-free production systems. In just two years’ participation in forums like this has more than doubled in Latin America, and clearly represents the growing interest, consumer support, and changing marketplace for more humane farming. As pointed out by many of the speakers, how animals are raised and the conditions they endure go hand in hand with a more sustainable future,” stated Carolina Maciel, director of Humane Society International in Brazil.

Producers are adapting their systems to meet new consumer demand, which is largely focused on animal welfare and sustainability. According to Mateus Paranhos da Costa, professor at São Paulo State University, who spoke about “demystifying” animal welfare, “The organization of this event is extremely timely, as it reinforces the need to integrate the animal welfare issue as one [of economic] sustainability criteria. There are many benefits to this integration, with ethical and practical implications for all livestock production chains, given the evidence that promoting the welfare of farm animals has the potential to contribute to the maintenance of balanced natural environments, healthy communities and the economic vitality of livestock activities.”

To complement, Leonardo Lima, corporate director of Social Commitment and Sustainable Development at Arcos Dorados, McDonald’s brand operator in Latin America and the Caribbean, said: “Arcos Dorados is a company with a long history of investing in sustainable initiatives in Brazil and Latin America and we are challenged to find new opportunities and use our scale to make a positive impact on the planet. Within this premise, we are pioneers in taking on challenging goals of sustainable livestock. We have also begun purchasing eggs from cage-free hens and have limited the use of gestation crates for pork producers. Animal welfare is one of our priorities and this Symposium is an opportunity to discuss the issue, learn about the actions being taken by the industry, and influence the whole chain.”

To give the discussion a global perspective, the symposium presented lectures from academic experts Dr. Linda Keeling of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, who spoke about the connections between animal welfare and sustainable development, and Dr. Natalie Waran of New Zealand, who spoke about the relationship between human health and animal welfare.

Successful Cases

One example of successful transition to cage-free egg production is Planalto Ovos (Brazil), a cage-free egg producer that was represented by Daniel Mohallen, director of the company: “This International Symposium is of paramount importance for the consolidation and recognition of production methods focused on animal welfare, mainly because it contains scientifically based discussions between scholars, researchers and participants in the production chain. Caring for animals is much more than a trend: it is a worldwide concern. We at Planalto Ovos feel privileged to be part of this great event.”

Humane Society International and World Animal Protection are working around the world to end the unnecessary suffering of farm animals. “The topic has been widely discussed since the 1970s, when consumers in Europe began to mobilize about how animals were reared. In Brazil, the public is raising their awareness regarding animal welfare. This is a topic that directly interferes in the purchase decision in a lot of countries, and in Brazil this trend will only grow. This is why companies have been putting the animal welfare team in their business strategies”, points out José Rodolfo Ciocca, manager of Humane and Sustainable Agriculture Campaigns for World Animal Protection. According to research commission by our organisation, 68% of Brazilians eat meat four times a day throughout the week. Of these, 82% are concerned with protein origin — proof that animal welfare and sustainability are important to the market.

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Media contact: Maria Fernanda Martin, mfmartin@hsi.org, +55 (11) 9 79909922

Consumers also want to know if the products they purchase were tested on animals

Humane Society International / Brazil


mustafagull/iStock.com

BRASILIA—An opinion poll released today by Humane Society International and conducted by Datafolha revealed that the vast majority of the Brazilian public want robust federal legislation against cosmetic testing on animals. According to 73% of respondents, if the Congress were to legislate on this matter, “cosmetics products should not contain new ingredients tested on animals.”

The poll also revealed that cosmetics product information is of special importance to consumers, with 75% of respondents declaring that the “guarantee that a cosmetic has not been tested on animals” is an influencing factor when purchasing cosmetics. Furthermore, 84% of respondents also declared that companies should be obliged to “inform in a clear manner if they still test their new products and ingredients on animals” once legislation has been passed.

Helder Constantino, HSI’s #BeCrueltyFree Brazil campaign manager, says: “The practice of testing cosmetics on animals has long been rejected by the public, and this poll illustrates how important this issue is for consumers. It also proves that consumers diligently check the products they purchase and do not want to be misled about them. We very much hope that the Congress will take note and legislate accordingly.

A report proposed to the Senate’s Commission of Economic Affairs (CAE) by Senator Alessandro Vieira amending Bill 70/2014 on cosmetic tests on animals would ban cosmetic products and ingredients tests on animals with immediate effect. It has yet to be voted on by the CAE.

The Datafolha opinion poll was conducted in August 2019, using a sample of 2,094 interviewees that was socially and geographically representative of the Brazilian population.

Facts:

  • Launched in 2012 by Humane Society International, #BeCrueltyFree is the largest campaign in history to end cosmetics animal testing and trade globally.
  • In Brazil, #BeCrueltyFree has received the support of Xuxa Meneghel, Fernanda Tavares, Ellen Jabour, Ray Neon, Rita Von Hunty and many other influencers and celebrities. #BeCrueltyFree has also been joined by other NGOs, such as Latin American consumer awareness group Te Protejo.
  • The states of Amazonas, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Pará, Paraná, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo have already banned cosmetic tests on animals. Together, these states host approximately 70% of Brazil’s national cosmetic industry.
  • Thirty-nine countries have already enacted measures aligned with the objectives of the campaign, including the European Union, Norway, India, New Zealand, South Korea, Taiwan, Guatemala and Australia. Similar legislation is under consideration in Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the United States and elsewhere.
  • Tests on animals are still allowed by National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (Anvisa) regulations to assess the toxicity of cosmetics. Although some tests have been recently abolished by the National Council for the Control of Animal Experiments (CONCEA), a body of the Ministry of Science and Technology, long-term toxicity tests that can use hundreds of animals to evaluate a single substance are still allowed.

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Media contact: Helder Constantino, hconstantino@hsi.org, +55 (21) 9 8342 4163

Humane Society International / Brazil


HSI

SÃO PAULO—Makro Atacadista, a major wholesaler, has announced it will only sell cage-free eggs at its locations throughout Brazil. Makro operates 68 stores in the country and will complete its transition to cage-free eggs by 2025 for Makro-brand eggs and by 2028 for all other brands sold in its stores. This announcement comes after many years of working with Humane Society International/Brazil, one of the largest global animal protection organizations. Makro and HSI will continue to work together on the implementation of this policy.

Maria Fernanda Martin, HSI/Brazil’s corporate policy and program manager for farm animal welfare, said: “We congratulate Makro for joining hundreds of food companies in Brazil and around the world in committing to source only cage-free eggs. By adopting cage-free egg policies, companies are meeting the growing global consumer demand for higher welfare products and generating change in the egg industry. We look forward to working with Makro on this important transition and invite other companies to join this global corporate social responsibility movement.”

This commitment will improve the lives of millions of laying hens in Brazil. Egg-laying hens are typically confined for their whole lives in wire battery cages so small that the hens cannot even fully stretch their wings. Cage-free systems generally offer higher animal welfare compared to caged systems, providing the animals with enough room to walk around and engage in their important natural behaviors such as laying their eggs in nests, foraging, perching and dustbathing.

Makro joins other food corporations that have committed to switching to exclusively cage-free eggs in Brazil and throughout Latin America, including Unilever, which has committed to a global cage-free egg supply chain by 2025, and Nestlé, the largest food company in the world, which has also committed to switching to cage-free eggs by 2025. After working with HSI, Burger King and Arcos Dorados, which operates McDonald’s in Brazil and 19 other countries in the region, committed to switching to 100% cage-free eggs, as did other restaurant operators, accounting for thousands of restaurants in Brazil and Latin America.

Compass Group (GRSA) and Sodexo have previously announced their commitment to a global cage-free policy in partnership with HSI. Alsea, the largest restaurant operator in Latin America and Spain, and Grupo Bimbo, the world’s largest bakery company, announced their cage-free egg policies after several years of engaging with HSI specialists. Corporations like Kraft-Heinz, International Meal Company (IMC), Cargill, Brazil Fast Food Corporation (BFFC), Subway, Intercontinental Hotels Group, AccorHotels, Marriott International, Hilton Worldwide, Giraffas, Barilla, Divino Fogão, Habib’s, Grupo CRM, Bauducco and Grupo LemosPassos have also pledged to go cage-free in Brazil.

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Media contact: Maria Fernanda Martin, +55 (11) 9 57709922, mfmartin@hsi.org

Humane Society International / Brazil


Bryan Mitchell/AP Images for the HSUS Teddy, an 18-month-old beagle, has fun at his new home Wednesday, May 22, 2019, in St. Clair Shores, Michigan. Teddy is a survivor from an animal testing facility in Michigan and was adopted by Greta Guest and David Rubello in April of this year.

BRASILIA—Humane Society International has welcomed sweeping animal welfare reforms to regulations governing the testing of agricultural pesticides in Brazil, including abolition of a controversial year-long poisoning test in dogs, recognition of modern animal testing alternatives, and creation of a process by which companies can request that scientifically unnecessary animal test requirements be waived. These and other reforms were published on 29 July by Brazil’s Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA) in RDC n. 294, replacing a nearly 30-year-old testing ordinance from 1992.

Publication of the new regulation has been delayed for years, so the test has remained an official requirement until now, despite HSI’s success in negotiating for the removal of the one-year dog test from a 2015 draft. A 2018 undercover investigation by the Humane Society of the United States found more than 30 beagles in a U.S. laboratory being used to test a pesticide for sale in Brazil, which the company defended on the grounds that the test is still officially “on the books.” Following intervention by HSI, ANVISA agreed to grant a waiver for the pesticide, and the company agreed to stop the test and release the surviving dogs – all of whom have now been adopted into loving homes.

Antoniana Ottoni, government relations manager for HSI in Brazil, said: “Today we celebrate the abolition of cruel year-long dog poisoning tests for pesticides in Brazil and worldwide. This and other changes to Brazilian regulations are a life-saving victory for animals, yet it’s disgraceful that it’s taken authorities 20 years to take action after the uselessness of the dog test was recognized by scientists. This underscores the need for increased dialogue and cooperation with authorities, industry and NGOs like HSI to ensure that continued progress doesn’t take another 20 years.”

HSI began negotiations with ANVISA around pesticide reform in Brazil in 2013, hosting a regulatory science workshop, a webinar and high-level meetings with agency scientists and executive leadership. In response to lengthy delays in publishing the new regulation, HSI launched in 2017 the campaign #AnvisaPoupeVidas, collecting over 160,000 signatures in a matter of weeks, calling for swift action by ANVISA.

Facts:

  • Pesticides are among the most heavily animal-tested substances in existence. For a registration of a single new pesticide “active ingredient” (the poisonous component that makes it effective), it is used on as many as 10,000 rodents, fish, birds, rabbits and dogs in dozens of separate chemical-poisoning tests. Many of these tests are overtly redundant, repeating the same test procedure using two or more different animal species or routes of exposure (oral, inhalation, skin, etc.), the scientific value of which has come under intense scrutiny.
  • The one-year dog toxicity test consists of force-feeding groups of beagle dogs a pesticide chemical every day for an entire year, after which the animals are killed and dissected to examine the chemical’s effects on their internal organs. Based on sound scientific evidence that this long-term poisoning test is completely unnecessary for pesticides safety assessment, every other country that had previously required the test has dropped it.
  • The main features of the new ANVISA norm include: 1) a formal waiver provision process through technical justification that will avoid new testing; 2) acceptance of animal testing alternatives recognized by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development; and 3) adoption of the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals.

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Media contact: Antoniana Ottoni, aottoni@hsi.org, +5561981403636

 

Humane Society International / Brazil


Cage-free chicken in Brazil
HSI

SÃO PAULO—Humane Society International, a leading global animal protection organization, urges the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply (MAPA) to reverse its administrative decision to limit the use of the term “cage-free” on labelling of eggs.  The label allows producers to meet consumers’ constitutional right to be informed about how their food was produced and enables them to choose the product that best meets their needs.  However, MAPA’s new interpretation of labelling requirements could prevent egg producers who use more humane cage-free systems from using the term “cage-free” on their packaging.

HSI submitted a technical legal note to MAPA, arguing that current legislation on inspection and labelling of eggs does not prevent eggs to be labelled “cage-free”, as long as the producer can demonstrate that a cage-free system was used. HSI’s submission also underscores the important role that accurate and complete label information plays in enabling conscious consumers to make informed choices.

Maria Fernanda Martin, HSI/Brazil’s corporate program and policy manager for farm animal welfare, said, “We have received numerous calls from stakeholders concerned with MAPA’s decision. We strongly believe that, on both technical and legal grounds, MAPA should revoke the decision.”

In the last several years, the cage-free movement has grown substantially in Brazil, with more than 100 leading food and hospitality companies having made commitments to use and sell exclusively cage-free eggs in all their operations and products by 2028, 2025 or earlier. Several Brazilian producers have already started cage-free egg production in at least 10 states (Amazonas, Pernambuco, Alagoas, Goiás, Minas Gerais, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Paraná, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul). In 2018 alone, three new egg producers started cage-free production with over 220,000 hens each. Other cage-free producers have expanded their production to meet the demand, and some traditional egg producers have begun to transition their systems to cage-free.

HSI will remain vigilant regarding MAPA’s decision and will continue to work with producers and the industry to transition to cage-free egg production systems.

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Media contact: Maria Fernanda Martin, mfmartin@hsi.org

Humane Society International / Brazil


Chicken

SÃO PAULO—Humane Society International applauds a recent decision by Walmart, Brazil’s third largest retailer, to make a new commitment to animal welfare by pledging to sell exclusively cage-free eggs by 2028 in all of its Brazil locations. This announcement comes after working with HSI and other animal protection organizations. Walmart and HSI will continue to work together on the implementation of this policy in all 471 stores throughout the country.

Maria Fernanda Martin, HSI/Brazil’s corporate policy and program manager for farm animal welfare, said: “We congratulate Walmart for joining hundreds of food companies in Brazil and around the world in committing to source only cage-free eggs. By adopting cage-free egg policies, companies are meeting the growing global consumer demand for higher welfare products and generating change in the egg industry. We look forward to working with Walmart on this important transition and invite other companies to join this global corporate social responsibility movement.”

This commitment will improve the lives of millions of egg-laying hens in Brazil. Egg-laying hens are typically confined for their whole lives in wire battery cages so small that the hens cannot even fully stretch their wings. Cage-free systems generally offer higher animal welfare compared to caged systems, providing the animals with enough room to walk around and engage in their important natural behaviors such as laying their eggs in nests, foraging, perching and dustbathing.

Walmart joins other food corporations that have committed to switching to exclusively cage-free eggs in Brazil and throughout Latin America, including Unilever, which has committed to a global cage-free egg supply chain by 2025, and Nestlé, the largest food company in the world, also by 2025. After working with HSI, Burger King and Arcos Dorados, which operates McDonald’s in Brazil and 19 other countries in the region, committed to switching to 100 percent cage-free eggs, as did other restaurant operators, accounting for thousands of restaurants in Brazil and Latin America. In Brazil, Compass Group (GRSA) and Sodexo have previously announced their commitment to a global cage-free policy in partnership with HSI. Alsea, the largest restaurant operator in Latin America and Spain, and Grupo Bimbo, the world’s largest bakery company, announced their cage-free egg policies after several years of engaging with HSI specialists. Corporations like Kraft-Heinz, International Meal Company (IMC), Cargill, Brazil Fast Food Corporation (BFFC), Subway, Intercontinental Hotels Group, AccorHotels, Marriott International, Hilton Worldwide, Giraffas, Barilla, Divino Fogão, Habib’s, Grupo CRM, Bauducco and Grupo LemosPassos have also pledged to go cage-free in Brazil.

 

Media contact: Maria Fernanda Martin, mfmartin@hsi.org, +55 (11) 9 5770 9922

Humane Society International / Brazil


Chickens

SÃO PAULO—Premier Pet, one of the largest pet food companies in Brazil, has announced it will switch to exclusively cage-free eggs in its entire supply chain by 2025, becoming the first pet food company to adopt this policy in Brazil and Latin America. This announcement comes after working with Humane Society International, one of the largest animal protection organizations in the world, and other animal protection organizations. Premier Pet and HSI will continue to work together on the implementation of this policy.

Cristiana F. Ferreira Pontieri, Premier Pet product development director, stated: “The adoption of the cage-free philosophy represents yet another step in PremieRpet®’s commitment to conscious consumption at all of our activity levels and reflects our concern for animal welfare and high quality ingredients. To lead this initiative in Brazil, in alignment with global trends, meets and strengthens our precepts of more natural production practices.”

Maria Fernanda Martin, corporate policy and program manager for HSI Farm Animals in Brazil, said: “We applaud Premier Pet for becoming the first pet food company in Brazil and throughout Latin America to pledge to use only cage-free eggs, and look forward to continuing to work with them and their egg suppliers on the implementation of this policy. This move will relieve thousands of egg-laying hens from a life of extreme confinement and sends a clear message to the egg industry that the future of egg production is cage-free.”

Egg-laying hens are typically confined for their whole lives in wire battery cages, so small that the cannot even fully stretch their wings. Both common sense and science agree that virtually immobilizing animals for their entire lives causes mental distress and significant physical pain.

Premier Pet joins hundreds of food corporations that have already committed to switching to exclusively cage-free eggs in Brazil and throughout Latin America, including Unilever, which has committed to a global cage-free egg supply chain by 2025, and Nestlé, the largest food company in the world, also by 2025. After working with HSI, Burger King and Arcos Dorados, which operates McDonald’s in Brazil and 19 other countries in the region, committed to switching to 100 percent cage-free eggs, as did other restaurant operators, accounting for thousands of restaurants in Brazil and Latin America. In Brazil, Compass Group (GRSA) and Sodexo have previously announced their commitment to a global cage-free policy in partnership with HSI. Alsea, the largest restaurant operator in Latin America and Spain, and Grupo Bimbo, the world’s largest bakery company, announced their cage-free egg policies after several years of working with HSI. Corporations like Kraft-Heinz, International Meal Company (IMC), Cargill, Brazil Fast Food Corporation (BFFC), SubwayIntercontinental Hotels Group, AccorHotels, Marriott International, Hilton Worldwide, Giraffas, Barilla, Divino Fogão, Habib’s, Grupo CRM, Bauducco and Grupo LemosPassos have also pledged to go cage-free in Brazil.

 

Media contact: Maria Fernanda Martin, mfmartin@hsi.org, +55 (11) 9 5770 9922

 Humane Society International and its partner organisations together constitute one of the world’s largest animal protection organisations. For more than 25 years, HSI has been working for the protection of all animals through the use of science, advocacy, education and hands on programs. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide – on the Web at hsi.org.

Humane Society International


Humane Society International / Global


Overview


Billions of farm animals suffer in factory farms globally, confined their whole lives to cages so small they can barely move. HSI works with governments, corporations, producers and institutions to enact reform, end intensive confinement farming and promote alternatives to inhumane farming practices.

Humane Society International / Global


Overview


Current egg, meat and dairy production and consumption practices are unsustainable and cause tremendous suffering. Choosing more plant-based options helps animals and the environment and supports your health.

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